The Coloradans charged in connection with Jan 6. Capitol attack

Suspects include an alleged militia leader, a geophysicist and a two-time Olympic champion

By: and - August 7, 2021 4:45 am

Pro-Trump extremists clash with law enforcement at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. (Alex Kent for Tennessee Lookout)

Multiple Colorado residents, including a two-time Olympic champion and a geophysicist, have been arrested and charged with crimes in connection to the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

NPR reports that over 640 people have been charged in connection to the attack, which the FBI views as domestic terrorism. The attack occurred during a Joint Session of the U.S. Congress, which was in the process of confirming the results from the 2020 presidential election. It came shortly after a nearby “Stop the Steal” rally held by then-President Donald Trump, and amid a swirl of election misinformation and fiery rhetoric from Trump’s supporters, including Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert of the 3rd Congressional District, who tweeted on the morning of Jan. 6 that “Today is 1776.”

Two organizers of a rally on Jan. 6 that led to the insurrection at the Capitol told Rolling Stone that they were in communication with Boebert. Boebert denied these allegations in an Oct. 25 tweet. 

The Department of Justice says that approximately 140 police officers were assaulted on Jan. 6 at the Capitol, including approximately 80 U.S. Capitol police officers and about 60 officers from the Metropolitan Police Department.

According to court documents for some of the people charged in connection with the Jan. 6 riot, the riot caused approximately $1,495,326 in damage to the U.S. Capitol.

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The FBI has received over 200,000 digital media tips from citizens around the country regarding the events of Jan. 6, according to the Department of Justice. As of early July, the FBI was still looking for help from the public in identifying over 300 additional suspects.

At least 78 people who have been charged in connection with the Jan. 6 attack have a military or law enforcement history, according to an NPR analysis. Fifty-five individuals who have been charged “invoked Trump to explain their actions.” NPR reports that while there are some exceptions, the people charged so far are predominantly white males.

The following are Coloradans who have been charged so far:

Jacob Travis Clark

Date and location of arrest: April 21, 2021, in Colorado Springs

A photo allegedly of Clark from a police body camera. (Screenshot)

Charges: (1) knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; (2) disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; (3) engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds; (4) violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; (5) obstruction of law enforcement during civil disorder; (6) obstruction of justice/congress 

When Capitol police officers told Clark, of Trinidad, and other people inside the Capitol building that they were just doing their jobs, Clark allegedly responded “So were the Nazis!” according to an affidavit.

A status conference is scheduled for Jan. 28, 2022. 

Glenn Wes Lee Croy

Date and location of arrest: Feb. 17, 2021, in Colorado Springs

ChargesCroy has pleaded guilty to parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building. This charge has a maximum sentence of six months of imprisonment and a fine of no more than $5,000, according to the plea agreement Croy signed. The plea agreement also requires Croy to allow law enforcement agents to interview him regarding the events around Jan. 6. In exchange for pleading guilty to count four, Croy will not be further prosecuted for the remainder of his charges in regard to his actions on Jan. 6, according to the plea agreement.

A photo allegedly of Croy, right, and Terry Lynn Lindsey inside the U.S. Capitol Building that an individual submitted to the FBI, according to an affidavit. (Screenshot)

Croy was previously charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building, disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building, and violent entry and disorderly conduct in a Capitol building. 

Croy remains free on personal recognizance bond and his sentencing hearing is scheduled for Oct. 15 at noon.

Croy was identified when an individual submitted a tip to the FBI, stating that Croy told the individual that he was at the Capitol riot and sent a picture of himself and another person, who was later identified as Terry Lynn Lindsey, inside the U.S. Capitol Building, according to an affidavit. The affidavit also states that Croy and Lindsey, who appears to be from Ohio, were friends on Facebook prior to the apparent deletion of Croy’s Facebook profile. 

Croy and his attorney requested that the court sentence Croy to 12 months of probation with community service, to account for Croy being the primary caretaker of two sons, one who has diabetes, and to account for Croy’s lack of preparing or planning prior to the events that took place on Jan. 6. 

The government requested that the court sentence Croy to two months of incarceration and $500 in restitution. 

“The government recognizes that Mr. Croy accepted responsibility early. Nonetheless, that does not excuse his contribution to the riot and its destruction,” the government’s sentencing memorandum, filed Oct. 22, says. “The defendant twice entered and walked through the Capitol in a mob. While inside, the defendant treated the Capitol like a vacation: he walked freely around the Capitol, took what he apparently perceived to be fun photos and videos of other rioters dressing statues, and posed for his own photograph by a statue that he later sent to his friends.”

In a letter to a judge filed Oct. 22, Croy wrote that while he isn’t a political person, he began watching more news when he lost his job in the summer of 2020 due to COVID-19. Croy said he watched the “Portland riots” on livestream for over 100 days and he “fell into rabbit holes” by being on the internet so much. 

Croy said that he “had no problem with who won the election,” but that he saw (on television) a lot of “weird peculiar things” in the election, like people kicking out observers or observers from the Republican Party not being allowed in. 

When former President Donald Trump announced the rally, Croy was still unemployed and was getting stimulus checks that he had saved up, so he decided to drive to the rally to show his support and to see Washington, D.C., for the first time, Croy said. 

At the Capitol, Croy said the majority of people were walking up a ramp and into the Capitol, and he “regretfully once again followed the crowd like a lemming.” 

“My adrenaline was up and I knew I wasnt supposed to be here but I was in the thick of it by this point.”

Croy said he was “not there to be violent or destructive” and had no forethought of entering the Capitol. “I regret being a part of the activity that day and have no excuse for following along. Most of the morning was a feeling of fellowship and camaraderie with everyone there and an afternoon was like a rollercoaster of bewilderment and chaos.”

Croy wrote that he has two sons whom he raised himself, and his youngest is a Type 1 diabetic. 

“I am guilty of being an idiot and walking into that building and again apologize to America and everyone effected for my role in participating.”

Croy was sentenced to 14 days in a community corrections facility and 3 years of probation at a hearing on Nov. 5, according to a 9news reporter. He is the first Colorado defendant involved in the Jan. 6 attack to be sentenced.

He is also required to pay $500 in restitution, according to the Department of Justice website

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Terry Lynn Lindsey was arrested on Feb. 17, 2021, in Ohio. 

Robert Gieswein

Date and location of arrest: Jan. 18, 2021, in Divide

A picture allegedly of Gieswein, according to an affidavit. (Screenshot).

Charges: (1) obstruction of an official proceeding; (2–4) three counts of assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers using a dangerous weapon; (5) destruction of government property; (6) entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon

Gieswein is a resident of Woodland Park and appears to be affiliated with the Three Percenters, a radical militia group, according to an affidavit. At least 11 people charged in connection to the Jan. 6 attack have alleged associations to the Three Percenters, according to NPR. The affidavit also alleges that Gieswein is the leader of the Woodland Wild Dogs, a private paramilitary organization training group.

Gieswein had an aerosol irritant spray and a baseball bat on his person, according to his indictment

In July, 9News reporter Jeremy Jojola tweeted that a judge denied Gieswein’s request to be released from custody pending his trial.

Robert Gieswein is seen in a photo, taken in front of Shooter’s Grill in Rifle, that has been circulated widely, including in the Daily Beast, and which he reportedly uploaded to his now-deleted Facebook page. The people in the photo are displaying a hand sign associated with the Three Percenters militia group.

In documents filed Nov. 18, Gieswein’s attorneys asked the court to reopen his detention hearing, and consider releasing Gieswein under “strict conditions” that were previously proposed. 

In the document Gieswein’s attorneys wrote, “as reported in the press, experts provided with third-hand reports of the atmosphere in Mr. Gieswein’s unit have voiced concern that the men there are vulnerable to radicalization due to the particular circumstances of their incarceration.” The footnote cites a Vice News article entitled “Capitol Rioters in Jail’s ‘Patriot Wing’ Have Their Own Rituals and a Growing Fan Base.” 

The court document goes on to say that people outside of Gieswein’s unit, and outside of the jail, view all the residents in the unit as one, and that this all raises a “significant concern that Mr. Gieswein, a very young man who came to the District alone, is now trapped in a highly charged environment that could potentially exert undue influence on his thinking, and may eventually create pressure on him to conform, or to allow others’ political narratives to drive his thinking and decision-making.” 

Gieswein is from Colorado, but asked to be released to the custody of his godmother, a risk management officer, and his godfather, a police officer, who live in Oklahoma, according to the document. At the time of his arrest, Gieswein was 24 years old.

Logan Grover

Date and location of arrest: April 28, 2021, in Erie

Charges: (1) entering and remaining in a restricted building; (2) disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; (3) violent entry and disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; (4) parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building.

Grover pleaded not guilty to the charges and remains free on personal recognizance, according to the Capitol breach investigation resource page.

Grover was identified when the FBI received a tip that Grover posted on Facebook that he flew to Washington, D.C., and planned to participate in the protest at the Capitol, according to an affidavit

The affidavit states that Grover is a resident of Erie.

Grover’s trial is scheduled to begin on June 1, 2022. A pretrial conference will be held on May 24.

Thomas Patrick Hamner

Date and location of arrest: Nov. 9, 2021, in Colorado Springs

Charges: (1) assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers using a dangerous weapon and aiding and abetting; (2-3) civil disorder and aiding and abetting; (4) entering and remaining in a restricted building; (5) engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon; (6) act of physical violence in the Capitol grounds or buildings

Hamner is 48 and from Peyton. There is video footage that depicts Hamner fighting with officers from the U.S. Capitol Police and the D.C. Metropolitan Police, according to court documents.

Lisa Anne Homer

Date and location of arrest: Nov. 26, 2021 in Colorado Springs

Charges: (1) knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; (2) engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; (3) engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct at any place in the Grounds or in any of the Capitol Buildings with intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session; (4) parading, demonstrating, or picketing in any of the Capitol Buildings.

Homer is released until her preliminary hearing on Feb. 10, 2022. She must “stay away” from Washington, D.C., except for attending court proceedings or meeting with counsel, as part of her conditions of release. Other conditions include not possessing any weapons and surrendering her passport.

In January 2021, Homer applied for an Arizona driver’s license and listed her residential address as Scottsdale. 

Court documents say that Homer was in the Capitol Building for approximately one hour and that she “moved extensively throughout the building,” but at this time, there is no evidence that Homer destroyed any property or assaulted any law enforcement officers. She entered the Capitol through a broken window.

The Wenatchee World, a news outlet based in Washington state, reported that Homer, a 50-year-old former Yakima resident, ran for a seat on the Yakima County Commission in 2018 as a Republican, but lost in the primary election. 

Homer posted pictures of herself on social media wearing a beanie with the words “Lions not Sheep,” the same beanie she allegedly wore at the steps of the Capitol building.

Jennifer Horvath

Date and location of arrest: May 3, 2022, in Colorado Springs

Charges: (1) knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; (2) disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; (3) disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; (4) other offenses on Capitol grounds

A screenshot allegedly of Horvath from a video posted online of the Jan. 6 insurrection.

Horvath is a Colorado Springs resident and the girlfriend of Wes Croy, according to FBI documents. The FBI learned of Horvath’s participation in the attack through a search of Croy’s cell phone, where they found text and instant messages Croy sent about being in the Capitol with “dia,” a nickname fro Horvath.

A former coworker of Horvath identified her in a screenshot from a video posted online of the day’s events. Additionally, during a September 2021 interview, Croy admitted that Horvath was with him the entire time on Jan. 6.

She is shown wearing a red Trump baseball hat, putting sunglasses on a bust of Winston Churchill and walking through the Capitol halls. She entered the building at approximately 2:28 p.m. and left at approximately 2:37 p.m., according to the FBI. She again entered the building at 3:21 p.m., was taken to the ground by an officer who believed Horvath had pepper spray, and then left around 3:30 p.m.

Klete Keller

Date and location of arrest: Jan. 14, 2021, in Denver

Keller pleaded guilty, to obstruction of an official proceeding, on Sept. 29 in a plea agreement. In exchange for pleading guilty, the government dropped the additional six charges Keller faced.

Keller also agreed to pay $2,000 in restitution to the Department of Treasury. 

In his Sept. 2 statement of offense, Keller said he “acted to affect the government by stopping or delaying the Congressional proceeding” and did so by “intimidating or coercing government personnel who were participating in or supporting the Congressional proceeding.” 

Court documents say that the maximum sentence for this charge is 20 years, but estimated sentencing guidelines for Keller are 21 to 27 months. The estimated fine could range between $10,000 and $95,000. 

Keller was previously charged with:  (1) civil disorder; (2) obstruction of an official proceeding; (3) entering and remaining in a restricted building or groups; (4) disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; (5) disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; (6) impeding passage through the Capitol grounds or building; (7) parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building.

Keller had previously pleaded not guilty to all charges

A photo of a man who appears to be Keller, according to an affidavit. (Screenshot)

Keller is a two-time Olympic champion in swimming, and a member of the 2000, 2004, and 2008 U.S. Olympic teams, according to the Team USA website. Keller is believed to have been wearing a Team USA Nike jacket with an Olympic patch on it, according to an affidavit.

ABC News reported that Keller’s former swim coach, Mark Schubert, “said he wishes he had been ‘more proactive’ in talking to Keller ‘about his life after swimming.’” Schubert said he was shocked when he learned that Keller was at the Capitol on Jan. 6. “My first thought was knowing that he has struggled trying to get a profession, trying to be a successful family man. All of those things came to mind and just made me feel very sad,” Schubert told ABC News. 

It is very simple and very clear. Mr. Keller’s actions in no way represent the values or mission of USA Swimming,” USA Swimming, the governing body for swimming in the United States, wrote in a Jan. 14 statement condemning Keller’s actions. “And while once a swimmer at the highest levels of our sport – representing the country and democracy he so willfully attacked – Mr. Keller has not been a member of this organization since 2008.”

The New York Times reported that Keller worked as a broker associate for Hoff & Leigh, a Colorado real estate firm. In January, the firm announced that Keller had resigned.

A status conference is scheduled for March 16, 2022. Keller remains on personal recognizance.

Avery Carter MacCracken

Date and location of arrest: Dec. 11, 2021, in Telluride

Charges: (1) assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers using a dangerous weapon or inflicting bodily injury; (2) civil disorder; (3) entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; (4) disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; (5) engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds; (6) act of physical violence in the Capitol grounds or buildings

MacCracken, 68, made his first court appearance on Dec. 14 and remains detained, according to a Department of Justice statement on Tuesday. MacCracken is accused of pushing, shoving and striking the face of a Metropolitan Police Department officer.

MacCracken was identified when a Telluride resident contacted the San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office to report recognizing MacCracken after the resident saw a picture of MacCracken on the FBI’s website, according to court documents. While San Miguel County Sheriff Bill Masters was examining the pictures provided by the resident, he also recognized MacCracken as being the person in the photo. Masters knows MacCracken “extremely well, with numerous and frequent contacts by himself personally, and by his deputies,” according to the document. Masters also said that he has seen MacCracken wearing the same clothes in Telluride that he was wearing in the pictures on the FBI website. 

Additionally, Chief Marshal Josh Comte of the Telluride Marshal’s Office reviewed the pictures on the FBI website and recognized MacCracken in them. Telluride Marshal’s Office deputies and Comte have had “numerous interactions” with MacCracken. 

MacCracken is considered a “transient with no permanent pace of residence,” according to the document, but he has been known to reside in the Telluride area for several years. 

MacCracken traveled from Montrose to Washington, D.C., on Jan. 3, 2021, and returned to Colorado on Jan. 9. 

U.S. Magistrate Judge Gordon Gallagher wrote that “by a preponderance of the evidence,” MacCracken is a flight risk and there is no condition or combination of conditions for release which will reasonably assure MacCracken’s appearance for court proceedings or that will assure the safety of the community, according to the order of detention, filed Dec. 17. 

Cleveland Grover Meredith Jr.

Date and location of arrest: Jan. 8, 2021, in Washington, D.C.

Charges: (1) interstate communication of threats; (2) possession of unregistered firearms; (3) possession of unregistered ammunition; (4) possession of large capacity ammunition.

According to an affidavit, the FBI received tips on Jan. 7 that Meredith had sent the following text: “Thinking about heading over to Pelosi C***’s speech and putting a bullet in her noggin on Live TV (purple devil emoji).” FBI agents searched Meredith’s trailer, where Meredith stated he had put two firearms, and found a “Glock 19, nine millimeter pistol, a Tavor X95 assault rifle and approximately hundreds of rounds of ammunition,” according to court documents. Meredith told FBI agents that he was originally planning to arrive in Washington, D.C. on Jan 5, but did not arrive until Jan 6., and it was too late to attend the rally, according to the affidavit. 

Two firearms that Meredith was in possession of at the time of his arrest, according to court documents. (Screenshot)

In court documents, federal prosecutors described Meredith as a “clearly disturbed, deranged, and dangerous individual that fantasizes about committing horrific acts of violence and takes countless steps to carry them out by driving across several states with a trailer stocked with thousands of rounds of ammunition and multiple firearms — including an assault style rifle — should not remain in the community.” He concluded the memorandum with a request that the court order Meredith to be detained without bond pending the resolution of the case.

Court documents from January state that Meredith is a Colorado resident, but multiple news outlets have reported that Meredith is a resident of Georgia. Meredith drove to the Capitol from Colorado. 

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that Meredith lived in Hiawassee, Georgia, and was involved in funding a controversial billboard that supported QAnon in 2018. QAnon is a term for internet conspiracy theories that falsely allege that the world is run by “a cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles,” according to The New York Times. 

Meredith pleaded guilty to one count of interstate communication of threats in a plea agreement. In exchange for signing the plea agreement, the government dropped Meredith’s remaining charges. 

The charge has a maximum sentence of 5 years in prison, though the estimated sentencing guidelines range from six to 24 months in prison, according to the plea agreement. The estimated applicable fines range from $4,000 to $75,000, though the maximum fine for the charge is $250,000. 

Newsline reached out to Meredith’s attorney about his residency and has not received a response yet.

Meredith was detained until his sentencing. 

Meredith is sentenced to 28 months in federal prison with a credit for time already served, according to court documents filed Dec. 21. The court recommended that Meredith serve his sentence at a facility that can provide “intensive mental health treatment” and that is as close to his family in Atlanta as possible. Once released, Meredith will be on supervised release for 36 months. 

Patrick Montgomery

Date and location of arrest: Jan. 17, 2021, in Littleton

Charges: (1) assaulting, resisting or impeding certain officers; (2) civil disorder; (3) engaging in physical violence in restricted building or grounds; (4) act of physical violence in Capitol grounds or buildings; (5) entering and remaining in a restricted building or ground; (6) disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; (7) disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; (8) parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol Building; (9) entering and remaining in the galley of Congress; (10) obstruction of an official proceeding and aiding and abetting

A picture allegedly of Patrick Montgomery’s Facebook page, according to an affidavit (Screenshot)

Several people submitted tips to the FBI regarding posts and photos on Facebook that appeared to be Montgomery, according to an affidavit

Montgomery has pleaded not guilty to all of the charges. Montgomery was released on a personal recognizance bond, according to the Justice Department.

Montgomery filed a motion on Dec. 6 to dismiss count ten of the second superseding indictment, which the court denied on Dec. 28.

Daniel Michael Morrissey

Date and location of arrest: Nov. 4, 2021, in Denver

Charges: (1) entering or remaining in a restricting building or grounds; (2) disorderly or disruptive conduct in any restricted buildings or grounds; (3) disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds; (4) parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building

KMGH reports that Morrissey is from Colorado and a 9news reporter tweeted that Morrissey is “Colorado-based.” Newsline spoke to Morrissey’s attorney, Anthony Solis, who would not confirm whether Morrissey is a Colorado resident. Morrissey surrendered in Colorado. 

A co-worker of Morrissey showed a witness a “selfie” of Morrissey inside the Capitol, which Morrissey sent to the co-worker. The witness reported it to the FBI tip line, according to the statement of facts. 

Morrissey was placed on a personal recognizance bond in November. As part of the conditions of his release, Morrissey was ordered to “stay away” from Washington, D.C., with the exception of attending court proceedings and meeting with his counsel. He is prohibited from possessing any weapons. 

Hunter Palm

Date and location of arrest: May 12, 2021, in Denver

Charges: (1) obstruction of an official proceeding; (2) entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds; (3) disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds; (4) entering and remaining in certain rooms in the Capitol Building; (5) disorderly conduct in a Capitol Building; (6) parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol Building.

Palm was identified by a family member who wrote a letter to the FBI on Jan. 8, 2021, according to an affidavit. The family member, who was identified as Witness 1 in court documents, wrote that Palm called Witness 1 and reported to the family member that Palm had entered the U.S. Capitol. Court documents state that Palm sat down at the head of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s conference table and put his feet on the table. Palm can be heard saying “I think I like my new dining room. I pay for it.”

Palm pleaded not guilty to all charges and remains free on personal recognizance, which does not require the defendant to pay money in exchange for being released prior to trial.

Jeffrey Sabol

Date and location of arrest: Jan. 27, 2021, in New York

Charges: (1) assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers using a dangerous weapon; (2) assaulting, resisting, or impeding certain officers; (3) civil disorder; (4) entering and remaining in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon; (5) disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building or grounds with a deadly or dangerous weapon; (6) engaging in physical violence in a restricted building or grounds; (7) act of physical violence in the Capitol grounds or buildings.

Sabol was taken into custody on Jan. 27 by officers from the Clarkstown Police Department in Rockland County, New York, who responded to a vehicle that was driving erratically and encountered Sabol, who was covered in blood and had apparently attempted suicide, according to an affidavit. Sabol allegedly told the officers, “I was fighting tyranny in the DC Capitol,” and “I am wanted by the FBI.” The officers who searched the vehicle found an airline ticket, Sabol’s passport, and his social security card, among other items, according to court documents.

When FBI agents spoke to Sabol and showed him a photo of an officer lying face down on the ground with Sabol over him, Sabol “acknowledged that he is the individual in the picture. Sabol acknowledged that this picture looked bad and he could not recall if he hit the police officer with the baton because he was in a fit of rage and the details are cloudy,” according to an affidavit. 

The Denver Post reported that Sabol is a 51-year-old Colorado geophysicist. Voter records indicate that Sabol is registered to vote in Jefferson County.

In January, Magistrate Judge Andrew E. Krause ordered that Sabol be detained because he was a “risk of flight/ danger.” 

In August, Sabol filed a motion to be released from pretrial detention on personal recognizance, in accordance with the Bail Reform Act of 1984. In Sabol’s memorandum in support of a motion for pretrial release from custody, he wrote that the government went to “great lengths” to “distort the trust, misrepresent facts, and rely on the actions of co-defendants on January 6, 2021 to compensate for its inability to demonstrate that defendant should be detained.”

In the government’s opposition to the defendant’s motion for pretrial release from custody, filed on Sept. 17, a judge recommended that Sabol’s motion to be released be denied. The judge cited that Sabol stole a baton from a police officer, who was lying on the ground after being assaulted, as a reason that Sabol would be a danger to the public if released.

Timothy Wayne Williams

Date and location of arrest: June 4, 2021, in Denver

Charges: (1) knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; (2) disorderly or disruptive conduct, at any place in the Grounds or in any of the Capitol Buildings; (3) parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol Building.

A photo allegedly of Williams, according to an affidavit. (Screenshot)

Williams is from Trinidad, according to court documents. Williams told FBI agents that he previously worked for GrowGeneration, a hydroponics equipment supplier in Trinidad, but that he lost his job because he would not take a COVID-19 test. Williams claimed he was not involved in any acts of property damage or violence, and that he did not take “any souvenirs or anything from the Capitol,” according to court documents.

Editor’s note: This story was updated at 12:45 p.m. on May 6, 2022, with new information.

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Julia Fennell
Julia Fennell

Julia Fennell is a former reporter for Colorado Newsline.

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Sara Wilson
Sara Wilson

Sara Wilson covers state government, Colorado's congressional delegation, energy and other stories for Newsline. She formerly was a reporter for The Pueblo Chieftain, where she covered politics and government in southern Colorado. Wilson earned a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University, and as a student she reported on Congress and other federal beats in Washington, D.C.

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