Biden says answer to gun violence ‘is not to defund the police’

Justice Department launches national ghost gun enforcement initiative

By: - February 4, 2022 5:00 am

A potential buyer tries out a gun that is displayed on an exhibitor’s table during the Nation’s Gun Show on Nov. 18, 2016, at Dulles Expo Center in Chantilly, Virginia. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden and Attorney General Merrick Garland traveled Thursday to New York City, where the lives of two police officers were claimed in recent shootings, as the administration unveiled a new initiative to combat gun violence.

A senior administration official told reporters that the White House is focusing on ghost guns, which are homemade guns that lack a serial number, making them difficult for law enforcement to trace. 

“The answer is not to defund the police,” Biden said, seeming to take a swipe at progressive Democrats and activists who have criticized police misconduct. “It’s to give you the tools, the training, the funding to be partners, to be protectors and the community needs you.”

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White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki was asked while on the way to New York about media reports that Biden is stuck between civil rights advocates pressing for police accountability and police organizations that want more public safety funding.

Psaki told reporters that Biden has a decades-long record for fighting crime. 

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He has never been an advocate for defunding the police, as you know, but his record on these issues long precedes his time as president,” she said.

Psaki said the president “believes that both need to come hand in hand — that pursuing police reform is a step that will help rebuild trust in communities and is something that is welcomed by many communities and police forces across the country, and he believes that goes in hand with public safety.”  

“Having effective, accountable community policing to help us — helps us fight crime, and it also makes us safer,” she said. 

Biden’s visit to New York was spurred by the deaths of two police officers who last month were shot and killed while on duty. Biden and Garland, along with Eric Adams, the newly sworn in mayor of New York, and Gov. Kathy Hochul, also attended a Gun Violence Strategies Partnership meeting to discuss community violence intervention programs with local leaders.

“It’s time to fund community policing to protect the community,” Biden said. 

Adams, who is a former police officer, said that during a visit to the White House he asked Biden to “speak with our city, state and federal law enforcement personnel, so we could have a 9/11 response to this violence.”

The Justice Department launched a national ghost gun enforcement initiative Thursday “designed to prevent these unserialized firearms from being used to commit crimes, including by prioritizing bringing federal charges against criminal use of these weapons,” according to the administration’s fact sheet.

The agency found that from January 2016 to December 2020, there were nearly 30,000 privately made firearms — or ghost guns — that were reported to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives by law enforcement.

“That is why we are strengthening our firearms tracking strike forces to disrupt the pipeline that floods our community with illegal guns,” Garland said. 

For that initiative, the agency will work to train prosecutors on ghost gun crimes as well as designate a ghost gun coordinator in each Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives field office to serve as a resource for local and state law enforcement officers and to answer questions about crimes that involve an unmarked firearm.  

The agency said it is also working to finalize a proposed rule to help curb the flood of untraceable guns.

Psaki said that the administration also wants to ensure that communities have the appropriate funds to help reduce violence in their communities. She mentioned Biden’s proposal to “double federal support for community policing with $300 million more for cities, plus another $200 (million) more for community violence intervention program.”

Biden in his budget for fiscal 2022 requested $9.4 billion to be allocated to reduce violent crime and gun violence and for police — an 8.9% increase from the fiscal 2021 budget. Biden also called on Congress to increase funding for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

“I’m confident that if we fund these programs, we will see a reduction in violence,” Biden said.

The Justice Department in April 2021 announced that it would also be publishing model “red flag” legislation for states. The bill would allow courts to temporarily remove a firearm from an individual who is distressed. 

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Ariana Figueroa
Ariana Figueroa

Ariana covers the nation's capital for States Newsroom. Her areas of coverage include politics and policy, lobbying, elections and campaign finance.

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